Striper Rockfish Fishing

Striped bass anadromous (Morone saxatilis, also called rock or rockfish) are typical members of the family Moronidae in shape, having a streamlined, silvery body marked with longitudinal dark stripes running from behind the gills to the base of the tail. It inhabits rivers, bays, inlets, estuaries, and creeks. It is quite abundant in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. There, it frequently grows over four feet in length and weighs over 22 kg (50 lb). A variety of angling methods are used, including trolling and surfcasting. The largest striped bass ever caught by angling was an 81.8 lb specimen taken in Westbrook, Connecticut on August 4, 2011.[1] The striped bass will swim up rivers a hundred miles or more, and in Maine they are quite plentiful in the Penobscot River and Kennebec River. Further south in Connecticut some very large ones are taken both offshore and in the Connecticut River, and the waters surrounding New York City have proven a fertile fishing ground with good sized specimens being caught during spring and summer months. In southern states such as Florida, striped bass are raised in hatcheries and are considered freshwater sportsfish. - Wikipedia