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410.474.9858

chesapeakebayoutdoors@gmail.com

 

Solomons Island, Maryland

Chesapeake Beach, Maryland

Point Lookout, Maryland

Cape Charles, Virginia

Chesapeake Bay OutDoors LLC

Located on the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, immersed in the history and beginnings of modern day Waterfowling and Charter Fishing, where Waterfowl Hunting and Charter Fishing are much more than a passion or a weekend hobby but rather a “WAY OF LIFE”. Life at Chesapeake Bay Outdoors revolves around two things, Charter Fishing and Waterfowl Hunting. It is a lifestyle that we enjoy 24 hours a day 365 days a year.

Chesapeake Bay Outdoors offers an unmatched level of professionalism, knowledge, and experience in Waterfowl Hunting and Charter Fishing. Captain Damon and his Colleagues bring over 100 years of professional experience in the field and they have spent their entire lives living and working on the Chesapeake Bay.

For those looking for the ultimate in Charter Fishing and Waterfowl Hunting, join Chesapeake Bay Outdoors on a world class Charter Fishing Trip or Sea Duck Hunt. Enjoy yourself while catching Trophy Rockfish, Redfish, Bluefish, Cobia, Spanish Mackeral or shooting Blue Bills, Canvasbacks, Old Squaws, Surf Scoters, Common Scoters, and White Winged Scoters, on the famous and historic Chesapeake Bay!

Captains Damon, Loch, and Brian are all USCG Licensed Master Captains, Maryland State Licensed Fishing Guides, and Maryland State Licensed Master Hunting Guides(Licensed Outfitters).

Colleagues

Loch Weems, Lochjaw Charters

Brian Elder, Teacher's Pet 

Copyright 2017 Chesapeake Bay Outdoors LLC

Contact Us

Chesapeake Bay Outdoors LLC

PO Box 352

St. Leonard, MD 20685

chesapeakebayoutdoors@gmail.com

410.474.9858

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Solomons Charter Fishing

The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), also known as channel bass, redfish, puppy drum, spottail bass, or simply red, is a game fish found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to northern Mexico.[1] It is the only species in the genus Sciaenops. The red drum is related to the black drum (Pogonias cromis), and the two species are often found in close proximity to each other; they can interbreed and form a robust hybrid, and younger fish are often indistinguishable in flavor.

Red drum are a dark red color on the back, which fades into white on the belly. The red drum has a characteristic eyespot near the tail and is somewhat streamlined. Three-year-old red drum typically weigh 6-8 lb. The largest red drum on record weighed just over 94 lb and was caught in 1984 on Hatteras Island. Red drum and black drum both make a croaking or drumming sound when distressed.

The most distinguishing mark on the red drum is one large black spot on the upper part of the tail base. Having multiple spots is not uncommon for this fish, but having no spots is extremely rare. As the fish with multiple spots grow older, they seem to lose their excess spots. Scientists believe that the black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum's tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape.[3] The red drum uses its senses of sight and touch, and its downturned mouth, to locate forage on the bottom through vacuuming or biting. On the top and middle of the water column, it uses changes in the light that might look like food. In the summer and fall, adult red drum feed on crabsshrimp, and mullet; in the spring and winter, adults primarily feed on menhaden, mullet, pinfishsea robinlizardfishspotAtlantic croaker, and mudminnows. - Wikipedia